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    March 30, 2014

    MOVIE REVIEW: CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER

    Hollywood’s tendency to exploit political allegory into their major plot of any given film (read Robocop) can be as risky and ballsy as this latest attempt from Marvel Studio to inject a game-changing development into the whole Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). In this sequel of Captain America’s solo journey film, it is vivid that Marvel Studio is willing to oppose the need for being too comfortable with the conventional MCU comic storyline. Much like last year’s Iron Man 3, the standard bar has indeed raised to a different level and game set. But of course, in between those high almighty preaches and lines about political twist, conspiracy theory and espionage affair; Captain America: The Winter Soldier remains parallel with the spirit of patriotism and typical alignment of any given MCU movie.

    Working from a screenplay from the usual MCU writing duo of Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, the Russo brothers (Arrested Development) compile this middle chapter into one of the densest, most variant and ambitiously revolutionist movies in the MCU. I thought they have done an amazing job in handling and shaping this movie to become bigger in every front. While the potential threat does not go across the nine realms, the possibility for this deadly secret will constantly makes us wonder about the fate of the characters. This goes along with some amazing old-school punching set-pieces and war-scale gunfights that inject pulsating sequences that intersperse with the decent film editing, great comedic timing and great original score. And every time Captain America is called into action to deal with the Winter Soldier and his henchmen, it feels like the movie drifts you aside from the heavy plotting into the territory where it has plenty of influence from The Raid and The Bourne trilogy.

    For the most part of the movie, the mechanical joint of each story element and characters do make and contribute into a compelling bigger call at the end. The plot flows well and it makes sense when the pieces of jigsaw are put together and the rich emphasis on the character development is truly amicable. You can also see how all the returning characters are having bigger moments and better story to live with, particularly Nick Fury who has a particular scene all for himself. Admittedly, the downside of this 136-minute long spy cum sci-fi flick is that it occasionally shattered by inconsistent pacing and lengthy exposition. While the first two acts successfully setting up the whole tempo with intriguing quest to unearth the conspiracy and evil plan, the third act is a little letdown as things go into a little drastic and distant from the momentum.

    But as it goes on, Captain America 2 continues to spring decent twists and surprises all along. It also does the impeccable job in keeping the movie in interesting wheels. Judging by the final product, this movie worth a lot more than that parallel TV series called The Agents of Shield. But it makes me wonder, what are installed for the next big thing called The Avengers: Age of Ultron? How will the TV series proceeds from here on? And what other game-changers I can expect in the future? And this goes along with many who have hypothesized this before – there will be a major shift on something that will totally flips the table of everything we have ever known.

    "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" stars Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Sebastian Stan, Anthony Mackie, Robert Redford and Samuel L. Jackson; presented by Marvel Studio and Walt Disney; directed by Anthony and Joe Russo ("You, Me and Dupree") from screenplay by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely ("Captain America: The First Avenger"). The movie is rated P13 and is released in Malaysia since March 27, 2014. The movie runs about 136 minutes.

    MY RATING:
    Story: 4.5
    Casts: 4.5
    Cinematography: 5.0
    Effects: 5.0
    GREEN-TEA-O-METER: 18.2/20.0
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